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Kittikamir Persians is a small cattery located about 15 minutes west of the Dallas/Ft Worth airport. We specialize in chinchilla and shaded silver Persians and are now producing shaded and chinchilla golden Persian kittens. We have been showing and and raising Persians since 1988 and have always bred to the standard of CFA. Health and personality are very important to us. For every Persian kitten for sale, we provide a health guarantee.

The Silver and Golden Division consists of chinchilla and shaded silvers and goldens. The exquisite silvers are considered the most ethereal of all Persians. The chinchilla is a sparkling white cat with black tipping scattered as evenly as stardust, ever so lightly, on the face, legs, tail and body. Shadeds show a mantle of black on the back, shading evenly down the sides. The tipping on the legs and face should match and is darker than the chinchilla. Goldens are either chinchilla or shaded. Their ground color is a rich, warm cream tipped with black. Silvers and goldens have green or blue-green eyes rimmed with black, black paw pads and brick red or rose nose leather.

The following is the CFA Standard for the Silver and Golden Persian Division.

CHINCHILLA SILVER: undercoat pure white. Coat on back, flanks, head and tail sufficiently tipped with black to give the characteristic sparkling silver appearance. Legs may be slightly shaded with tipping. Chin, ear tufts. stomach, and chest pure white. Rims of eyes, lips and nose outlined with black. Nose leather: brick red. Paw Pads: black. Eye color: green or blue-green. Disqualify for incorrect eye color being copper, yellow, gold, amber, or any color other than green or blue-green.

SHADED SILVER: undercoat white with a mantle of black tipping down from sides, face, and tail from dark on the ridge to white on the chin, chest, stomach and under the tail. Legs to be the same tone as the face. The general effect to be much darker than a chinchilla. Rims of eyes, lips and nose outlined with black. Nose leather: brick red. Paw Pads: black. Eye color: green or blue-green. Disqualify for incorrect eye color being copper, yellow, gold, amber, or any color other than green or blue-green.

CHINCHILLA GOLDEN: undercoat pale honey to bright apricot. Coat on back, flanks, head and tail sufficiently tipped with black to enhance a golden appearance. Legs and end of tail may be shaded with tipping. Chin, ear tufts. stomach, and chest consistant dilute color, much lighter in tone than the undercoat. The general effect is much lighter than a shaded golden due to less tipping. Rims of eyes, lips and nose outlined with black. Nose leather: rose. Paw Pads: black. Eye color: green or blue-green. Disqualify for incorrect eye color being copper, yellow, gold, amber, or any color other than green or blue-green.

SHADED GOLDEN: undercoat pale honey to bright apricot with a mantle of black tipping shading down from the sides, face, head, and tail. Legs to be the same tone as the face. Coat on back, flanks, head and tail sufficiently tipped with black to enhance a golden appearance. Legs and end of tail may be shaded with tipping. Ear tufts, chin, chest, stomach, and underside of the tail, consistant dilute color, much lighter in tone than the undercoat. The general effect is darker than a chinchilla golden due to more tipping. Rims of eyes, lips and nose outlined with black. Nose leather: rose. Paw Pads: black. Eye color: green or blue-green. Disqualify for incorrect eye color being copper, yellow, gold, amber, or any color other than green or blue-green.

BLUE CHINCHILLA GOLDEN: undercoat ivory to pale honey. Coat on back, flanks, head, and tail sufficiently tipped with blue to enhance a golden appearance. Legs and end of tail may be shaded with tipping. Chin,ear tufts, stomach, chest and underside of tail, consistent ivory to pale honey color. The general effect is lighter than a blue shaded golden due to less tipping. Rims of eyes, lips and nose outlined with blue. Nose leather: rose. Paw Pads: Blue or rose. Eye color: green or blue-green. Disqualify for incorrect eye color being copper, yellow, gold, amber, or any color other than green or blue-green.

BLUE SHADED GOLDEN: undercoat ivory to pale honey with a mantle of blue tipping shading down from the sides, face and tail. Legs to be the same tone as the face. Chin,ear tufts, stomach, chest and underside of tail, consistent ivory to pale honey color. The general effect is darker than a blue chinchilla golden due to more tipping. Rims of eyes, lips and nose outlined with blue. Nose leather: rose. Paw Pads: Blue or rose. Eye color: green or blue-green. Disqualify for incorrect eye color being copper, yellow, gold, amber, or any color other than green or blue-green.

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Declawing of Cats
CFA Guidance Statement

 

Declawing of Cats - CFA guidance statement
Approved by the CFA Board of Directors - October 1996 and revised June 2003
by Joan Miller
CFA Health Committee

CFA's Health Committee proposed the following guidance statement on the declawing of cats after review of the Canadian Veterinary Medical Association's (CVMA) position concerning declawing, and after research of scientific articles and information from the Cornell Feline Health Center, from Joan Miller's files of cat fancy and animal shelter materials and by talking with veterinarians, feline behavioral specialists, The American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA), the President of the American College of Behaviorists and the Director of Ethical Studies at the San Francisco SPCA. At the October 1996 meeting, the CFA Board unanimously approved a guidance statement on the declawing of cats. A revised guidance statement was approved at the June 2003 Board meeting.

"The Cat Fanciers' Association recognizes that scratching is a natural behavior of cats and that cats may be defenseless without full use of their claws if they, either intentionally or unintentionally, go outdoors. Scratching damage to household furnishings can be minimized or avoided by routine clipping of the claws, the use of claw covers and by redirecting the cat's activity to acceptable surfaces.

CFA perceives the declawing of cats (onychectomy ) and the severing of digital tendons (tendonectomy) to be elective surgical procedures that are without benefit to the cat. Because of the discomfort associated with any surgery and potential future behavioral or physical effects, CFA disapproves of routine declawing or tendonectomy surgery in lieu of alternative solutions to prevent household damage. In certain situations, including high risk of injury or disease transmission to owners with bleeding disorders or compromised immune systems, declawing may be justified in order to maintain the cat-human bond. "